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Acadja Atidza Mangroves in Ghana

Mangroves in Ghana: Man Cuts Down Mangrove Trees To Construct Atidza Traps

Video and photos of a man transporting mangrove branches over the Densu River. Mangroves, also known as the Guardians of the Coast, provide incredibly important ecosystem services, including support for threatened species.

September 8, 2020

Man transports black mangrove branches over the Densu River to construct brush parks. Accra, Ghana. Copyright © 2020 Muntaka Chasant

Video and photos of a man transporting mangrove branches over the Densu River. Mangroves, also known as the Guardians of the Coast, provide incredibly important ecosystem services, including support for threatened species.

My heart sunk when I turned around and saw the man in the photo above (40 seconds video below) transporting black mangroves (Avicennia germinans) tree branches he had just cut down over the Densu Delta lagoon in Accra, Ghana’s capital city.

Tidal river fishermen around the Densu River use mangroves vegetation in the area to construct Atidza or Acadja brush parks.

About 3 min after the man had meandered his way south, the man above (a different person) showed up.

All within a span of 5 minutes.

Atidza/Acadja around the Densu Delta lagoon involves the use of mangrove brush bundles to create artificial habitats to attract fish, including blackchin tilapia (Sarotherodon melanotheron).

But mangroves are incredibly important trees, and cutting them down exposes the Densu Delta’s wetland ecosystems to erosion, waves, winds, and floods. This even threatens coastal communities.

Mangroves are incredibly important trees, and cutting them down exposes the Densu Delta’s wetland ecosystems to erosion, waves, winds, and floods.

See photos of fishermen engaged in Atidza/Acadja: Fishing in Ghana: Atidza (Acadja) Brush Park Fishing

Why Are Mangroves Important?

Mangroves also serve as nursery habitats for fish and crustaceans.

Aside from providing habitats for hundreds of species (including threatened and endangered species), they also filter and trap sediments and other pollutants, helping to maintain water quality.

These tough trees that thrive in salty conditions also trap and store more carbon1 than even rainforests2, helping to tackle climate change.

Mangrove trees in Ghana are regularly cut down for fuelwood, timber, and fish traps.

Reclaiming lands for human settlement, agriculture, and salt pans also threaten mangrove forests.

Copyright © 2020 Muntaka Chasant

Sources

  1. https://iopscience.iop.org/article/10.1088/1748-9326/aabe1c/pdf
  2. https://royalsocietypublishing.org/doi/10.1098/rsbl.2018.0208

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